Wildlife Conservation News



 
Wildlife and our last remaining wild places are being destroyed because of human action or inaction and because of our own short –term greed.

Peter Fearnhead, CEO, African Parks Network, South Africa


 

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  1. Swing over to the Sumatran Orangutan Society to find out more

    SOS (Sumatran Orangutan Society) has a new project partner – Nature for Change (NFC).

    They work to save the forests of the Leuser Ecosystem by addressing the survival of people living near the ecosystem’s buffer zone.

    Back in 2019, they enabled farmers to plant 5,000 fruit trees.   They are growing another 5,000 in their community tree nursery – and these will be planted in 2020.

    The team has started to work with farmers on bee-keeping as another way to make a living.  An expert visited them in January 2020 to train the farmers who were taking part in how to set up beehive and the hives will have bees in them very soon!

    You can really make a difference to orangutans

    NFC also has implemented its border patrol team.   They have been trained by national part officers and they are working on a number of things:

    • They maintain the trails along the national park border
    • They fix and replace signs
    • They record observations about wildlife tracks and signs along the border
    • They meet with farmers to build trust and gain their understanding so that they can appreciate how the farmers feel about wildlife.

    The team has also installed camera traps along animal trails.  These will give them a good understanding of the kind of wildlife in the area – wild pigs, Thomas leaf monkeys and porcupines have been spotted already.  This is invaluable information because it helps the team plan their work with farmers and their crops.

    This is all very exciting, because locals are essential in any battle to preserve habitat for wildlife and yet give those living there an income.

    You can find out more and donate here.

  2.  

    The rainforests in Madgascar and the animals living there needs our help.

    The rainforests there are affected by two things:  climate change – and deforestation on a large scale.

    The thing is, that these rainforests are home to wildlife that isn’t found anywhere else on earth. It’s got 101 different lemur species, for example. 

    One Minute Action :  Help save the animals in the rainforests of Madagascar

    Losing Madagascar’s rainforests would lead to an enormous and irreversible loss of biodiversity.

    But it doesn’t have to be that way.  

    The key is for those in power to do something now to prevent the destruction f their homeland forever.

    Sign the petition to urge officials in Madagascar

    to impose strict protections to save their rainforest.

     

  3. In Africa’s Cameroon, 60,000 hectares of rainforest are at risk from deforestation.

    The area is home to western lowland gorillas, chimpanzees, elephants, buffalo, panthers and pangolins.

    Threat to wildlife living in these hectares

    Unfortunately, the government is in the process of allocating 60,000 hectares of rainforest to the Cambert SARL company for palm oil plantation. 

    Did I mention that Cameroon is one of the few countries in the world where there are gorillas?  They, and the Campo Ma’an National Park are in danger from deforestation.

    There’s a cost to the fishermen and Bagyeli indigenous people living there, too.  They are already suffering the effects of rubber and palm oil plantations and now they risk losing their livelihood. 

    Stop the depletion of forests in Cameroon

     

    How to help this rainforest

    Rainforest Rescue need as many of us as possible to sign their petition, or call to action.

    But what does Camvert actually REALLY want the area for?  One possibility is that they want it for wood.

    Nearly 40 envrionmental protection organsiations are fighting against this destruction.

    Please support the resistance in Cameroon and sign Rianforest Rescue’s petition.

    Take action now - Sign the petition

  4. The World Land Trust has great news for forests!

    On 16 January 2020, the Governement of Belize signed the declaration of North-eastern Biological Corridor of Belize.  It covers an area of nearly 70,000 acres and links the northernmost nature reserve in Belize with more central natural habitats.

    It’s really important, because it’s the first step towards achieving a total North-South corridor crossing the whole country as the map shows!

    Jaguars and other wildlife now have room to roam

    ©World Land Trust

    It’s a tremendous example of public-private partnership:  the government of Belize, local NGOs, private landowners and many international donors – including the World Land Trust – have been involved.

    UNITED FOR CONSERVATION,
    WE CAN DO GREAT THINGS TO MAKE A DIFFERENCE FOR THE BETTER

    The corridor connects a system of three protected areas in one system.  Deforestation has caused the loss of over 25,000 acres of forest in tihe last 10 years.

    This will now allow big animals such as jaguar and Baird’s Tapirs enough space to move freely between protected areas and so ensure their long term survival!  It will also help build climate resilience into Belize’s network of protected areas.

    Why was this acquisition necessary?

    In Belize, about 50% of the country is under natural vegetation cover.  About 35% of the country is under some form of protection. 

    So it is still possible to create biological corridors between protected areas.

    It’s vital that these acquisitions take place, and speedily, because agricultural development are increasingly encroaching on forest.

    How did supporters of the World Land Trust
    – people like you & me –
    help in this achievement?

    The World Land Trust mobilised its supporters and inspired new ones to raise funds to support this land acquisition.  It included 2018’s Big Match Fortnight Jungle for Jaguars campaign, and another Buy an Acre opportunity a few months after that.  (The Big Match Fortnight normally comes in October when donations are matched for a specific appeal – it is incredible how much and how speedily this builds up.)

    Donate in memory of someone special
    I donated to this campaign during the Big Match Fortnight (actually in memory of my wonderful Dad as his birthday is in November and I plant a tree or do a buy an acre on his birthday and at Christmas for him, as Dad loved trees). 

    Ask someone to donate as a gift for you
    I asked my husband to also donate as my early Christmas present and it was by far the best present I had.   It really meant something to me.  We had made a difference.

    I cannot tell you the glow and warm feeling I have in my heart when I think of my jaguar roaming the biological corridor.   I call him “my jaguar” – he obviously isn’t, and I’m never going to meet him – but it’s lovely to think that because I donated and my husband has too, we’ve helped him and lots of other animals.

    Please do donate to the World Land Trust if you can, and keep an eye on their website.  I often post news of their new appeals here, so you can watch this space as well.  They are a wonderful charity and it’s good to give a meaningful gift which will last, so if you’re looking for a gift for a wildlife lover, making a donation could be a great way to do something to really make a difference – a win, win, win all round!

    This was the You Tube Video for Jungle for Jaguars – it raised £532,000 in the Big Match Fortnight (normally early October) alone and hit the £600,000 target by Christmas, helping to save 8,154 vital acres.  A further 1,818 acres were saved a few months later.