Actions for Animals

 
 
 
Wildlife and our last remaining wild places are being destroyed because of human action or inaction and because of our own short –term greed.

Peter Fearnhead, CEO, African Parks Network, South Africa

 RSS Feed

  1.  

    The 21st June is World Giraffe Day.  Why the 21st June?  Well, it’s the longest day or night in the year, depending on where you live!

    The Giraffe Conservation Foundation initiated the day to celebrate this beautiful species, but the event also raises support and awareness of the work the Foundation (and others) are doing to help these incredible animals.  Habitat loss is the main threat to giraffes – they have lost nearly 90% of their natural habitat in the last 300 years and now there are only about 117,000 giraffe left in the wild

    World Giraffe Day 2022

    In 2022, World Giraffe Day is dedicated to Bringing Giraffe Back To Mozambique! 

    The country has suffered from years of civil unrest.  CGF want to raise US$250,000 to secure a future for giraffe in Mozambique and bring giraffe back to the areas where they have gone locally extinct or are low in numbers. 

    The Giraffe Conservation Foundation has undertaken translocations of giraffe before:


    There are now only about 250 giraffe left in Mozambique.  So over the next 5 years, GCF will work with the government there and their partners, to move over 350 giraffe to four key parts of the nation

    This will achieve the following:

    1. It will double the giraffe population
    2. It will re-establish southern giraffe in their historic range
    3. It will open over 3 million acres of prime habitat for the giraffe to live in

    Will you help GCF achieve this goal and help giraffes? 

    You can donate, and you can support them on social media with any of these hashtags: 

    #GiraffeConservationFoundation

    #WorldGiraffeDay

    #WorldGiraffeDay2022

    #StickYourNeckOutForGiraffe

    #StandTallForGiraffe

    You can join in on social media:

    Facebook: @giraffeconservationfoundation

    Instagram: @giraffe_conservation

    Twitter: @save_giraffe

    Find out more about GCF’s Mozambique Programme and World Giraffe Day.

    Please donate here

  2. There’s good news for giraffe in Kenya.

    The Giraffe Conservation Foundation reports that they have made efforts to make sure that giraffe numbers in Kenya receive better protection. 

    The charity has given financial support to the Kenya Wildlife Service and other conservation partners to undertake aerial surveys in northern Kenya.

    And good news!  The surveys are showing a 30% increase in reticulated giraffe numbers on communal land and private conservancies in the last 6 years.

    Meantime, in the south of Kenya, the charity has held the first ever Masai Giraffe Working Group meeting to bring conservation partners together with the Kenya Wildlife Service.  The aim was to identify current threats to Masai giraffe and pinpoint measures to protect them.

    And there’s more – the charity’s year long surveys in Mwea National Reserve and Ruma National Park show there are double the numbers of Nubian giraffe than previously thought, so this is a great boost to Nubian giraffe there.

    There are renewed efforts to update and complete a National Recovery and Action Plan for giraffe in Kenya, held over a two day workshop.  The plan will be launched later this year.

    Don’t forget – a date for your diary – the 21st June is World Giraffe Day.  Why not adopt a giraffe as a gift for someone or for yourself?

    Click here for wildlife holiday ideas in Kenya listed on Responsible Travel

     Click here for wildlife holiday ideas in Kenya listed on Responsible Travel

     

  3. Giraffes are in trouble.  The giraffe population is already down between 36 to 40%.

    For the first time ever, 5 African countries are proposing to add the giraffe to the list of protected species.  This would really make a difference.

    How you can help giraffes with a click

    There’s a petition calling on CITES to launch and fund an Africa-wide Giraffe Action Plan.  The Plan would:

    • Recover giraffe populations
    • Protect giraffe habitats
    • Support local communities living alongside giraffes

    The petition can be found at Avaaz.org.  Avaaz.org is a world-wide community with nearly 50 million members.  It has petitions you can set up and sign to give your support to proposed changes or messages about causes you care about and want to help

    Please sign this petition to help giraffes today!

    When you go through to Avaaz and the petition, there’s a picture of someone called Tess and a dead giraffe, just to warn you. 

    Avaaz say that Tess killed the giraffe for fun. She's certainly got a big smile on her face. There are no words to describe how I feel about people who do this.

    Why this petition to help giraffes now?

    Very shortly, countries from across the world will meet for a crucial global wildlife summit.

    Back in January 2019, 57 proposals to amend the list of species subject to CITES regulations were submitted by 90 countries for consideration.   This consideration will take place from 23 May to 3 June 2019 in Colombo, Sri Lanka, at the 18th Meeting of the Conference of the Parties to the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora.

    (I can’t help feeling that if they spent less time making up titles like that, and more on protecting wildlife, we might make more progress.)

    So how could this CITES meeting affect giraffes?

    For the first time ever, five African countries have proposed adding giraffes to the list of protected species.

    You can see the species here that the meeting will consider, and find out about the proposal to protect giraffes here

    Sign the Petition at Avaaz.org now,

    Then please share the petition widely to help make the senseless killing of this giraffe into a new direction for giraffes.

     

     

  4. This blog was first published on 20 June 2019 and then again with John Bishop's Great Whale Rescue programme in October 2020  - and now there's more news!

    Hot on the news that the Greeks have created the world’s first dolphin sanctuary, two Beluga Whales from an aquarium in Shanghai have just arrived in Iceland 6,000 miles away to go to a whale sanctuary there.

    The whales – Little Grey & Little White – are 12 years old.  They’ve been in captivity since they were about 2 years old and performed in font of crowds as “entertainment”. 

    The British Firm that runs the aquarium – Merlin Entertainment – bought the Changfeng Ocean World Zoo in 2012.  And it started to look for a home for Little Grey & Little White.

    Head of the British Conservation Charity, Sea Life Trust, explained that preparations have been on-going for about 18 months to prepare the whales for their journey.


    They travelled by plane on a Cargolux freighter to Iceland, then, truck and a ferry from the mainland to the island where they will live.  Teams monoitored the whales to ensure they were safe and comfortable during the flight.  A Cargolux engineer and a team of global veterinary experts with experience in transporting marine mammals were also on board to check on the whales’ welfare.

    Their new home is the world’s first open water Beluga sanctuary – it will provide a more natural sub-Arctic environment for them, with wilder habitat.  The bay will be protected to protect the two female whites as it is thought they won’t survive on their own in the wild.  The Sanctuary is in a natural and beautiful sea inlet, in Klettsvik Bay.  There’s a landside care facility, and a visitor centre minutes away – so you can visit!

    The sanctuary was created in partnership with Whale and Dolphin Conservation.  It’s run by the SEA LIFE Trust with a donation from Merlin Entertainments.   

    Scientists are going to study Little Grey & Little White to see how they adapt to their new natural home.  And depending on how they get on, the sanctuary could become home to other Belugas as well.

    So here's the update:  May 2022

    Little White and Little Gray are released into an open sea sanctuary, where they can adapt and explore.  They will then be released further into the open sea - and monitored to ensure they can live in peace.

    Find out more about the two Beluga Whales here

    Good luck in your new home, Little Grey & Little White and a big thank you to Cargolux Airlines for your help and role in moving Little Grey & Little White to sanctuary.  

    And if you're in the UK, why not check out The Cornish Seal Sanctuary, which rescues and rehabilitates grey seals pup from around the Cornish Coastline.

     

  5. I’ve had an email from Fauna and Flora International (FFI) about an impending crisis that is about to get catastrophically worse.

    The beautiful Cardamom Mountains in Cambodia are being covered in snares. 

    FFI say that the snares are shredding through clouded leopards, ripping elephant trunks in half and snapping the limbs of their calves.  Pangolins, sun bears, moon bears and indeed any mammal than a mouse are being badly impacted, as any animal larger than a mouse can be trapped in these cruel snares.

    To make matters worse, FFI’s project funding in the area has fallen through.  FFI patrol teams are still able to operate in some areas and maintain an effective resistance.  A very generous donor has enabled them to remove countless snares – and so save many, many animals.  FFI had hoped to extend the areas that they were covering.


    Unfortunately, the donor is unable to continue their support – and FFI must fill a £92,345 hole. 

    If FFI cannot fund the project, the warden leaders won’t be able to pay their patrol teams’ wages – and any who have the means won’t be able to have equipment and the backing to mount and maintain an effective resistance. 

    Funds will be spent on boots, machetes, camping gear, hammocks, rucksacks and everything wardens need to wear as they go out on one patrol after another.   The wardens need GPS kits, patrol mapping – and they need to be paid. 

    FFI say time is short. 

    What’s so important about the Cardamom Mountains?  Well, they have dense rainforest, mangroves and wetlands – and they have more than 60 globally threatened animal species and 17 globally threatened trees.  The Cardamom Mountains matter.  These include:

    • Asian elephants
    • Sun bears
    • The clouded leopard,
    • Dholes, a type of wild dog
    • The Sunda pangolin

    This elephant has been injured by a snare - the boot is protecting his leg
    Young elephant wears a protective boot
    to help recovery, after being caught in a snare.
    Credit: Charnwood Photo

    These snares are CRUEL – as the metal clasp tightens, causing the animal terrible pain.  The more they struggle, the tighter the snare gets, cutting more and more deeply into flesh and bone.  It is a terribly cruel and painful way to die.   

    At the same time, the animals have lost their habitat, because of illegal logging, land encroachment and unsustainable agricultural ways of doing things.  Over 10% of the forest has gone in 15 years  So the animals find themselves in smaller spaces, into what is known as a “wall of death”, because it is easy for them to get trapped by a snare.

    Enter the wardens. They are from the local communities and they cover over 100km every month, spotting and removing snares, watching for any signs of illegal poaching or logging, and undertaking biomonitoring and data-gathering activities.   These activities are important because they give a better understanding of the wildlife in the area, and enable the right decisions to be made about how to help them.

    The clouded leopard is well adapted to prowling through the forest

    The clouded leopard is well adapted to prowling through the forest
    Credit:  Bill – Adobe Stock

    Wardens also help by supplying the human-wildlife conflict teams with flashlights and noise-makers.  These can help deter elephants from the boundaries of farms and villages, so preventing damage to crops and property. These things make a huge impact – there have been no retaliation elephant killings since the wardens started such work.

    The warden team is essential to protect the animals of the Cardamom Mountains. 

    Please help today by making a donation.