Actions for Animals

 
Wildlife and our last remaining wild places are being destroyed because of human action or inaction and because of our own short –term greed.

Peter Fearnhead, CEO, African Parks Network, South Africa

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Category: Wildlife Habitat: National Parks

  1. The Green Match Fund 2021 is from 22nd to 29 April 2021 - don't miss it! One donation, double the impact!

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    The Big Give's Green Match Fund 2021 takes place from 22nd to 29th April 2021.

    Whilst match funds last, donations you make to the incredible environmental charities who are taking part will be doubled! 

    “One donation, twice the impact!”



    Don't miss this opportunity to let your £5 donation become £10 without any extra effort from you! 

    Charities taking part include

    • RSPB
    • Blue Marine Foundation
    • Friends of the Earth
    • Highlands and Islands Environment Foundation
    • Space for Giants
    • Conservation Collective
    • Virunga Foundation
    • Trees for Life
    • Global Canopy
    • Rainforest Foundation UK
    • Surfers against Sewage
    • Bumblebee Conservation Trust
    • A number of Wildlife Trusts
    • Rewilding Britain
    • Marine Conservation Society
    • World Land Trust
    • Whitley Fund for Nature
    • Tree Sisters
    • David Shepherd Wildlife Foundation
    • Plantlife
    • Trees for Cities
    • Garden Organic
    • John Muir Trust
    • Scottish Seabird Centre
    • Heribean Whale and Dolphin Trust
    • Cheetah Conservation Fund  UK
    • Orangutan Foundation
    • Environment Justice Foundation
  2. The Green Match Fund 2021 is from 22nd to 29 April 2021 - don't miss it! One donation, double the impact!

    Posted on

     

    The Big Give's Green Match Fund 2021 takes place from 22nd to 29th April 2021.

    Whilst match funds last, donations you make to the incredible environmental charities who are taking part will be doubled! 

    “One donation, twice the impact!”



    Don't miss this opportunity to let your £5 donation become £10 without any extra effort from you! 

    Charities taking part include

    • RSPB
    • Blue Marine Foundation
    • Friends of the Earth
    • Highlands and Islands Environment Foundation
    • Space for Giants
    • Conservation Collective
    • Virunga Foundation
    • Trees for Life
    • Global Canopy
    • Rainforest Foundation UK
    • Surfers against Sewage
    • Bumblebee Conservation Trust
    • A number of Wildlife Trusts
    • Rewilding Britain
    • Marine Conservation Society
    • World Land Trust
    • Whitley Fund for Nature
    • Tree Sisters
    • David Shepherd Wildlife Foundation
    • Plantlife
    • Trees for Cities
    • Garden Organic
    • John Muir Trust
    • Scottish Seabird Centre
    • Heribean Whale and Dolphin Trust
    • Cheetah Conservation Fund  UK
    • Orangutan Foundation
    • Environment Justice Foundation
  3. Please see this video from Gravitas - how nature is reclaiming its spaces due to the Coronavirus

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    Sometimes you see something on the internet or on television that really hits you hard and makes a point extremely well.

    I saw this video, this afternoon, and I wanted to share it with you.  Please share it with everyone you can.

    The ultimate message is that we SHARE this planet.  It demonstrates how dominant the human race has become - and how selfish.   I am not going to tell you anymore about it - please just watch it for yourself.   Here it is:



    Thank you, Gravitas.

    Please vow to make a difference today. 
    Find out how to reduce your impact on the earth's resources here.

     

     

     

     

  4. Save the Murchison Falls in Uganda

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    There’s news from the Wildlife Conservation Society.

    A spectacular wilderness in Uganda is under threat from Uganda’s Electric Regulatory Authority which is looking for approval for a new hydroelectric plant connected to the park’s amazing waterfalls.

    Save the Murchison Falls


    The Murchison Falls National Park is not only one of the most popular tourist attractions in Uganda.  It’s also home to elephants, lions, hippos and giraffes and many other species.  A few years ago in fact, scientists surveyed the area – they found it twice as rich in wildlife as previously thought.

    If the ERA gets approval for this plant, it would be devastating for both wildlife and locals who need tourism.  Across many sectors, there’s growing outcry that this damming of the river which feeds the Murchison Falls is a bad idea.

    And the wildlife and locals in Murchison Falls need support from outside Uganda to stop the building of the plant.

    There needs to be a global response which emphasise the importance of this national park – and others like it.   We all need to make it clear that protecting Uganda’s biodiversity is important to all of us, not just Uganda.

    Will you add your support?   The Wildlife Conservation Society is asking as many people as possible to speak up by 3 July so that they can delivery comments to the ERA

    Please show your support.  Let the ERA know the plans for a new dam should not go ahead.

    Give your support to wildlife and sign here

     

  5. Water flow lessens animal-human conflict in Liwonde National Park, Malawi

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    Water flow lessens animal-human conflict in Liwonde National Park, Malawi

    We all need water, humans and animals.

    So what happens when there is competition between humans and animals for water?

    Liwonde National Park in Malawi is home to over 10,000 different species.   Black rhinos, elephants, zebras and baboons are among them – the place is a biodiversity hotspot.

    The Shire River passes through the area, and is a vital life source for all the animals there.

    Years of poaching, illegal fishing and snaring have devastated the park’s ecosystem.  Competition for resources has rocketed; as well as the animals, people need water to survive. 

    The people of Chikolongo had to go miles to retrieve water from the Shire River – it was the only major source of water available.  In their trek, the journey often led to death for people and animals – especially as a result of human encounters with crocodiles, elephants and hippos.

    Find out about the Chikolongo Livelihood Project


    The IFAW (that’s the International Fund for Animal Welfare) heard about the crisis in Chikolongo and knew they had to help.

    So in 2013, they created the Chikolongo Livelihood Project – designed to build sustainable solutions to reduce the conflict between villages and wildlife.

    They completed a water pump and pipeline to bring easily accessible and clean water directly into the heart of the Chikolongo community.

    Since that pipeline was created, there have been no incidents of human-wildlife conflict.  The villages have what they need to co-exist amongst the animals they had thought were dangerous.  They are happier.

    Plus, IFAW established a community fish farm and developed an incentive system to encourage the growth of commercial crops which was designed to help reduce poaching. 

    And the animals of Liwonde National Park are successfully recovering.

    Find out more about the initiative here