Wildlife Conservation News

 
Wildlife and our last remaining wild places are being destroyed because of human action or inaction and because of our own short –term greed.

Peter Fearnhead, CEO, African Parks Network, South Africa


 

Koalas need our help as bushfires rage in Australia

Posted on

0 Comments

Wildfires often hit the headlines now, but the media are slow to consider the impact they have on wildlife.  Sometimes they say “nobody died” and I really wonder if they are aware of the millions of animals who have been injured or, worst, died in the fires.

And at the moment wildfires are raging, in California and New South Wales.

In New South Wales, they are burning across Port Macquarie.  It’s estimated that between 20,000 to 48,000 koalas live both here and in Queensland.  They are heading for extinction here as early as 2050.

It’s feared that a large number of koalas may have died in the flames.  Others will be homeless as their trees have burnt down; more will be suffering from smoke inhalation or burns.

WWF Australia urgently needs all our support to help restore koala habitat and to care for injured wildlife.   Every single koala matters.

Koalas need trees.   Trees have been burnt down in wildlifes, killing koalas and leaving them homeless. But we can all help.

Please help koalas today and help WWF Australia plant the first 10,000 trees 

WWF have launched a plan to save koalas and to help protect and restore the trees they call home.

The WWF Plan is called Two Billion Trees, and it’s a commitment to secure two billion trees over the next decade.  These will provide vulnerable wildlife with safe homes by:

• Stopping excessive tree-clearing
• Protecting existing forest and woodland
• Restoring and planting new trees

Whatever the outcome for koala numbers, their habitats will need to be restored, both for koalas and other wildlife.  The thing about koalas is that they are dependent on trees.  They need them for their food, their shelter and their safety.   Trees make a difference to koalas.  Without trees, they have nowhere to call home.

So the area where the effort is to be concentrated is a koala triangle, between south west Sydney, Gennedah and Noosa.   It’s the heartland of Australia’s healthiest wild koala populations, but it’s threatened, not just by bushfires but by development.

Please help plant the first 10,000 urgently needed trees in critical koala habitat, to save our precious koalas before they’re gone forever.

All photos are copyright to WWF

 

Add a comment:

Leave a comment:

Comments

Add a comment