Wildlife Conservation News



 
Wildlife and our last remaining wild places are being destroyed because of human action or inaction and because of our own short –term greed.

Peter Fearnhead, CEO, African Parks Network, South Africa


 

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  1. The Sierra Club (a grassroots environmental organisation in the US) has announced that there’s big, exciting news from a bank!

    JPMorgan Chase have announced at its annual Investor Day that:

    • It will not finance oil and gas extraction in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge
    • It will not continue financing many coal-related enterprises, including thermal coal mines and coal-fired power plants across the world.

    The bank is by far the leading US investor in fossil fuels, and environmentalists and indigenous peoples have put pressure on the bank for years trying to move away from projects which threaten the climate.

    They promised to stop investing in and providing services to companies which derive “the majority of their revenues from the extraction of coal” by 2024, and not to provide financing to offshore and onshore oil and gas extraction in the Arctic

    Goldman Sachs also made a similar commitment not to financial oil drilling in the Arctic two months ago.

    Now, it’s vital that we put the pressure on other big banks to follow suit. 

    I wonder...

    Could their executives and shareholders live with themselves if there was an accident drilling for oil and gas in the Arctic which they had agreed to finance?  It only takes ONE spill to do unrepairable damage.  As the Sierra Club say, “Clean air, safe drinking water, wildlife and wild places are under attack-and once they're gone, they're gone for good.” 

    Dive in and put pressure on the banks
    © istockphoto.com Mario Hoppmann


    Tell These Big US Banks That Arctic Drilling Is Bad Business!

    The Sierra Club say that banks worldwide are refusing to fund Arctic drilling.  Some US banks are dragging their feet.  But Goldman Sachs have done it;  they were the trail-finders who have ruled out financing Arctic oil and gas drilling, thermal coal mines and coal-fired power projects around the world.  Thank you, everyone at Goldman Sachs.

    Sierra Club

    Big banks don’t want to fall behind on industry trends.  

    The Sierra Club is asking us all to focus our efforts on the other US funders which, they say, are notorious for propping up dirty fuels:  Wells Fargo, Citi, JP Morgan Chase, Bank of America, and Morgan Stanley.

    The Sierra Club are asking everyone to:

    Send a message to the CEOs of the other major US banks, telling them that bankrolling Arctic drilling isn’t just bad business -- it’s a threat to Indigenous human rights and to the climate.

    Add your name here and you can send a message too, if you want to add power to it.

    Let’s all fight for wildlife and indigenous peoples and drill hard and deep for change in the right direction.  Let’s put pressure on. 

     

  2. On 23 February, there was a BBC Radio 4 Appeal by Angela Rippon – journalist and broadcaster – for EIA’s Tiger Campaign.

    And if you missed the broadcast, don’t worry – you can listen to it here:  And it’s being broadcast again on Radio 4 on Thursday 27 February at 3:27pm.  

    So who are the EIA?




    Find out more about it here.

    What's happening with tigers?

    There are only about 4,000 tigers in the wild because of poaching and habitat loss.

    Thousands more are captive in tiger farms, to meet rising demand for their skins, teeth, claws and meat.  Even dead tiger cubs born in commercial captivity are used to make tiger wine.

    In China, there’s a massive tiger farming industry.  Close to 6,000 are captive – their skins are used for luxury home décor, or they are used as ingredients in traditional Chinese medicine.

    Another 2,000 tigers are held captive in Vietnam, Laos and Thailand.  In Vietnam, adults and cubs are bred in cages in the backyards of ordinary houses – and they are sold by the kilo.

    How can you help?

    Donate to the BBC Radio 4 appeal  and help tigers and other threatened species a chance at a future, enabling EIA to continue their work exposing environmental crime.

    Visit the EIA here (that’s the Environmental Investigation Agency) to find out more about the work they do and to spread the word

    Visit the Programme’s website here – it has details of how to don 
  3. I’m a big fan of the World Land Trust and I always thinking it’s very exciting to see where they are going to work to save land next and follow the appeals.

    The new appeal they have just launched (end February 2020) is in Columbia and here it is:

    Here it is!

    ©World Land Trust

    WLT are working with Fundacion Biodiversa Colombia to save 260ha of lowland forest and wetlands. 

    They need to raise £295,000 to ensure these habitats are safe.  The area has already suffered from extreme deforestation and degradation – a whopping 90% of the original forests have been lost, so it’s vital to protect the remaining 10%.

    Hop over to the World Land Trust's website and help©World Land Trust

    Many endangered species live there, from the American Manatee and Magdalena River Turtle to the Lowland Tapir and Jaguar.  There are a lot of monkeys there – the White-footed Tamarin, the Brown Spider Monkey and the Varied White-fronted Capuchin.

    The World Land Trust works closely with local conservation organisations and it speaks very well of FBC’s track record of conservation.

    Your donation and mine will make a difference.
    If you can't donate, please please spread the word

    Our support will mean that this area is immediately protected – either that, or the logging industry will get it.

    Support land purchase for conservation and help ensure that healthy, biodiverse habitats survive.

     

  4. Swing over to the Sumatran Orangutan Society to find out more

    SOS (Sumatran Orangutan Society) has a new project partner – Nature for Change (NFC).

    They work to save the forests of the Leuser Ecosystem by addressing the survival of people living near the ecosystem’s buffer zone.

    Back in 2019, they enabled farmers to plant 5,000 fruit trees.   They are growing another 5,000 in their community tree nursery – and these will be planted in 2020.

    The team has started to work with farmers on bee-keeping as another way to make a living.  An expert visited them in January 2020 to train the farmers who were taking part in how to set up beehive and the hives will have bees in them very soon!

    You can really make a difference to orangutans

    NFC also has implemented its border patrol team.   They have been trained by national part officers and they are working on a number of things:

    • They maintain the trails along the national park border
    • They fix and replace signs
    • They record observations about wildlife tracks and signs along the border
    • They meet with farmers to build trust and gain their understanding so that they can appreciate how the farmers feel about wildlife.

    The team has also installed camera traps along animal trails.  These will give them a good understanding of the kind of wildlife in the area – wild pigs, Thomas leaf monkeys and porcupines have been spotted already.  This is invaluable information because it helps the team plan their work with farmers and their crops.

    This is all very exciting, because locals are essential in any battle to preserve habitat for wildlife and yet give those living there an income.

    You can find out more and donate here.