Actions for Animals

 
"Never doubt that a small group of thoughtful, committed citizens can change the world;
indeed, it's the only thing that ever has." 
Margaret Mead, American anthropologist, 1901-1978
 

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Category: Environment

  1. Act for wildlife in Cambodia with FFI's urgent appeal in the Cardamom Mountains

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    I’ve had an email from Fauna and Flora International (FFI) about an impending crisis that is about to get catastrophically worse.

    The beautiful Cardamom Mountains in Cambodia are being covered in snares. 

    FFI say that the snares are shredding through clouded leopards, ripping elephant trunks in half and snapping the limbs of their calves.  Pangolins, sun bears, moon bears and indeed any mammal than a mouse are being badly impacted, as any animal larger than a mouse can be trapped in these cruel snares.

    To make matters worse, FFI’s project funding in the area has fallen through.  FFI patrol teams are still able to operate in some areas and maintain an effective resistance.  A very generous donor has enabled them to remove countless snares – and so save many, many animals.  FFI had hoped to extend the areas that they were covering.


    Unfortunately, the donor is unable to continue their support – and FFI must fill a £92,345 hole. 

    If FFI cannot fund the project, the warden leaders won’t be able to pay their patrol teams’ wages – and any who have the means won’t be able to have equipment and the backing to mount and maintain an effective resistance. 

    Funds will be spent on boots, machetes, camping gear, hammocks, rucksacks and everything wardens need to wear as they go out on one patrol after another.   The wardens need GPS kits, patrol mapping – and they need to be paid. 

    FFI say time is short. 

    What’s so important about the Cardamom Mountains?  Well, they have dense rainforest, mangroves and wetlands – and they have more than 60 globally threatened animal species and 17 globally threatened trees.  The Cardamom Mountains matter.  These include:

    • Asian elephants
    • Sun bears
    • The clouded leopard,
    • Dholes, a type of wild dog
    • The Sunda pangolin

    This elephant has been injured by a snare - the boot is protecting his leg
    Young elephant wears a protective boot
    to help recovery, after being caught in a snare.
    Credit: Charnwood Photo

    These snares are CRUEL – as the metal clasp tightens, causing the animal terrible pain.  The more they struggle, the tighter the snare gets, cutting more and more deeply into flesh and bone.  It is a terribly cruel and painful way to die.   

    At the same time, the animals have lost their habitat, because of illegal logging, land encroachment and unsustainable agricultural ways of doing things.  Over 10% of the forest has gone in 15 years  So the animals find themselves in smaller spaces, into what is known as a “wall of death”, because it is easy for them to get trapped by a snare.

    Enter the wardens. They are from the local communities and they cover over 100km every month, spotting and removing snares, watching for any signs of illegal poaching or logging, and undertaking biomonitoring and data-gathering activities.   These activities are important because they give a better understanding of the wildlife in the area, and enable the right decisions to be made about how to help them.

    The clouded leopard is well adapted to prowling through the forest

    The clouded leopard is well adapted to prowling through the forest
    Credit:  Bill – Adobe Stock

    Wardens also help by supplying the human-wildlife conflict teams with flashlights and noise-makers.  These can help deter elephants from the boundaries of farms and villages, so preventing damage to crops and property. These things make a huge impact – there have been no retaliation elephant killings since the wardens started such work.

    The warden team is essential to protect the animals of the Cardamom Mountains. 

    Please help today by making a donation.

     

  2. The Green Match Fund 2021 is from 22nd to 29 April 2022 - don't miss it! One donation, double the impact!

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    The Big Give's Green Match Fund 2022 takes place from 22nd to 29th April 2022.

    Whilst match funds last, donations you make to the incredible environmental charities who are taking part will be doubled! 

    “One donation, twice the impact!”

    Don't miss this opportunity to let your £5 donation become £10 without any extra effort from you! 

    Use the Filter facility to find Animal and/or Environment/Conservation charities taking part.

    Charities taking part include

    • Virunga Foundation (gorillas)
    • Devon Environment Foundation
    • Beaver Trust
    • RSPB
    • South Downs National Park
    • Scottish Seabird Centre
    • WWT (Curlews)
    • Population Matters
    • Rainforest Concern (leatherback turtles)
    • Bat Conservation Trust
    • Thin Green Line Foundation to protect Sumatran wildlife
    • Sumatran Orangutan Foundation
    • Westcountry Rivers
    • Ghost Fishing
    • Organisation Cetecea
    • Great Bustard Group
    • Chipembele Trust
    • Trees for Life (red squirrels)
    • Rainforest Trust UK (African rainforests)
    • Buglife
    • A number of Wildlife Trusts
    • Whitley Fund for Nature
    • ZSL - Year of the Tiger
    • David Shepherd Wildlife Foundation
    • Heribean Whale and Dolphin Trust
    • Global Canopy
    • Earthwatch
    • Surfers against Sewage
    • UK Antarctic Heritage Trust
    • International Tree Foundation 
    • Bumblebee Conservation Trust
    • Rewilding Britain
    • Action for Conservation
    • Lewa Wildlife Conservancy
    • John Muir Trust
    • Cool Earth Action
    • Bees for Development Trust
    • Blue Marine Foundation
    • Trees for Cities
    • Butterfly Conservation
    • Cheetah Conservation Fund  UK
    • Orangutan Foundation
    • Environment Justice Foundation
    • Salmon and Trout Conservation UK
    • Hammersmith Community Gardens Association (beekeeping)

    and there are many more!  The match is available whilst funds last so don't delay,  leap to find out more and/or donate now - please spread the word! 

     

  3. It's the Great British Spring Clean from 25 March to 10 April 2022

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    Get involved in the Great British Spring Clean 2022!

    PLEDGE HERE to join the #BigBagChallenge

    The Great British Spring Clean is in its 7th year in 2022 and this year, you can join in the #BigBagChallenge and pledge to pick up as much litter as you can during the campaign. 

    This is something you could do as an individual, as a couple of people, as a family, a group of friends, a club - whatever you want.  Why not do it at work, and make it a team group activity?  

    There's lots of advice and tips on the website to help you including covering aspects of health and safety, insurance and disposing of your litter and recycling.

    You can pick up litter when you're walking your dog, walking to work or school, even jogging.

    One bag, big difference!


    And the great thing about litter picking is that you know you are making a difference.   New research from YouGov in conjunction with Keep Britain Tidy, 60% of children aged 6 to 17 feel happier when taking eco-action outside, such as picking up litter.  You can pledge as a school, to get involved.

    And it can give you a feeling of taking control and doing something positive for our environment.  Cut litter, end waste and help protect wildlife - far too many get injured or killed because of our litter, so you will be protecting them at the same time!

    COVID Advice for those taking part

  4. Earth Hour 2022 is on 26 March 2022 at 8:30pm local time

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    Earth Hour is back, and this time it is on Saturday 26 March 2022 at 8:30pm local time to you! 

    This is a great chance to switch everything off.

    Earth Hour started back in 2007 by WWF and partners in Sydney to raise awareness of climate change and it's a huge grassroots movement for the enviornment.  Every year people in over 190 countries and territories take part and take action.   

    You can simply switch off your lights - why not enjoy the night sky for an hour?  Or take part in an event, or hold your own event and find out more about climate change and  habitat loss. 

    Don't miss Earth Hour 2022!
    Twitter:
      @EarthHour
    Facebook: @EarthHour
    Instagram:  @EarthHourOfficial

    You could share your stories online of what you personally are doing to take action and join groups who are making a difference.  

    Why not make a start by calculating your own footprint on the planet?  You can do this on the WWF website and then it has suggestions of what you can do to reduce it.  Give it a go!

    Above all, you can go beyond the hour - and see what you can do to change your lifestyle to reduce your impact on climate change, and to put pressure on goverments and companies to make the right decisions, for people, for the planet and of course for wildlife.

    Visit the website here

  5. Help the Rainforest Trust save a vital 110 acres of Colombian tropical forest

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    The  is working hard to buy 110 acres of Colombian tropical forest.  

    The Rainforest Trust is on the verge of purchasing and protecting 110 vital acres of Colombian tropical forest.  

    The tropical forests are endangered themselves as farms expand and other developments take place.  They are the only place on the planet where you'll find cotton-top tamarins - whose numbers have gone down 80% in just 20 years.

     

    Help the Rainforest Trust save 110 vital acres of tropical rainforest in Colombia

    Help the Rainforest Trust save 110 vital acres of tropical rainforest in Colombia
    Please donate here

     

    As well as cotton-top tamarins, the area is also home to spider and howler monkeys, a critically endangered turtle species and scarlet macaws.  

    Local organisation Fundación Proyecto Tití is working hard to protect the whole area.

    They have blocked the creation of a clear-cutting cattle ranch.

    Now they are working with the Rainforest Trust to secure more land.  The land is critical becuase it will give the animals safe passage - a corridor - between protected areas.  It will give the animals the vital space they need to recover and survive. 

    We can all help the Rainforest Trust achieve this goal.  

    Find out more from the Rainforest Trust and donate here.

    You can donate to this project through SumofUs who partner the Rainforest Trust