Wildlife Conservation News

 
Wildlife and our last remaining wild places are being destroyed because of human action or inaction and because of our own short –term greed.

Peter Fearnhead, CEO, African Parks Network, South Africa


 

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Category: Bird Conservation

  1. Please help puffins in Iceland - they need your voice

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    Here we go again.  More trophy hunters after the thrill of the kill.

    This time, it’s gorgeous, adorable puffins. 

    Companies in Iceland (the country, not the supermarket) are offering guided puffin hunts.  A hunter can pay $3,650 each for a chance to bag up to 100 puffins at a time.  How on earth can you want to do that?

    The IUCN’s Red List lists puffins as “vulnerable”.  And that means that if things don’t change for the better, they could go extinct.

    Please give puffins in Iceland your voice

    Over the last 10 years, Iceland’s Atlantic puffin population has fallen by 1.5 million.  And Iceland allows hunters to kill thousands of puffins every year.  Many end up on plates in local restaurants, served to curious tourists. 

    And by the way, companies in Iceland also give people the chance to hunt reindeer, goose, and Ptarmigan.

    Millions of people want to get a closer look at puffins every year, from the island of Alderney to Norway, the Faroe Islands, the USA and Canada.  Many of these places have puffin viewing tours, which give people the chance to see puffins alive and close up.

    So why can’t Iceland stop the hunt to kill puffin tours and put more emphasis on having hunt to see, enjoy and love tours instead?

    Please sign this petition. 

    Tell Iceland's president Jóhannesson to protect their puffins, not kill them.

    And by the way, Theresa Villiers, Britain’s new environment secretary, is being urged to ban puffins which have been killed in trophy hunts. And also to push CITES to list seabirds for global protection. 

    RSPB Spotlight Puffins

    RSPB Spotlight Puffins
    £9.99
    from the RSPB Online Shop

  2. There’s good news in Northumberland, thanks to nature lovers.

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    There’s good news in Northumberland, thanks to nature lovers.

    Nature lovers there have got together to help buy and protect a tract of land there.  It’s a 600 acre site called Benshaw Moor in Redesdale, with heather habitat, peatland and limestone waterfall and springs.

    Birdlife at Benshaw include curlew, snipe, skylark, meadow pipit and short-eared owls.

    It’s now Northumberland Wildlife Trust’s 63rd nature reserve.

    600 acres at Benshaw Moor is safe, thanks to a united effort
    ©Duncan Hutt

    Thanks to a united effort, 600 acres at
    Benshaw Moor in Northumberland is safe.

    The Trust was concerned that the land be used for business such as a commercial conifer forestry, or windfarm.  Shooting will not be allowed there any longer.

    £570,000 was raised from charitable trusts, businesses and a significant bequest.   The public donated £75,000.  The bequest came from the late George Swan, who wrote the Flora of Northumberland which was a record of the county’s plant species.  Mr Swan specified that the bequest be used to buy a site of botanical importance.

    Nature lovers will still be involved:   the wildlife charity’s team and volunteers will do surveys to better understand the site to help guide its future management.  Possible options include areas of native woodland, and conservation grazing, with Exmoor ponies or cattle.

    It just shows what can happen if we all get involved and unite for wildlife.  

    Find out how you can get involved in and help the Northumberland Wildlife Trust – even if you don’t live in this beautiful area!

    Get involved  - volunteer, visit nature reserves, go to events etc

    Support the Northumberland Wildlife Trust – donate, become a member, leave a legacy.

    There are 46 Wildlife Trusts around the UK and in Alderney and the Isle of Man – find your local here

     

  3. Save land, save species

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    The World Land Trust has just launched its new appeal, to protect forest in Kenya on the coastline.

    Dakatcha has been identified as a Key Biodiversity Area and an Important Bird Area.  It has no official protection – but the future of this habitat could be secured under the ownership of Nature Kenya.

    The World Land Trust partners with Nature Kenya and their current project is to protect 810 acres before the threats of illegal charcoal production, hunting, controlled pineapple farming and the persistent threat of deforestation see this rare area burn.

    Save land by sponsoring an acre – or even quarter of an acre, and you can help save a species.

    You can get involved by sponsoring an acre for £100, half an acre for £50, or a quarter of an acre for £25.00

    So why save Dakatcha?

    The You Tube video below shows the reasons why we should all help save the area.    It’s a vital area for people and animals locally, but it also is the case that every single healthy intact forest we can save will help us in the fight against climate change. 

    New species are still to be found here, as little is known about the forest – but it is known that endangered species such as the Clarke’s Weaver, the Sokoko Scops Owl and the Golden Oriole need this area. 


    Donate £25 to save a quarter of an acre of Dakatcha.

    Donate £50 to save half an acre of Dakatcha.

    Donate £100 to save an acre of Dakatcha.


    The World Land Trust are looking to save 810 acres and people have started to donate to save these acres already :-) 

    I’m making a donation in memory of my wonderful father on this Father’s Day.   He loved his feathered friends and his trees – and he enjoyed a family holiday to Kenya many years ago.  So the ties are there, and I can’t think of a better way to remember my father than save an acre of forest in his memory.

    Save land, save species here.

     

  4. Huge new conservation area in Bolivia’s Gran Chaco

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    There’s a new protected area in Bolivia! It spans over 12,000 square kilometres – that’s 4,650 square miles.  And it includes well-conserved forests – it’s home to 300 species of birds and 100 species of jaguars, pumas and night monkeys.  It’s home too to the Ayoreo indigenous community which is voluntarily isolated.

     “Ñembi Guasu” means “the great hideout” or “the great refuge.”  The creation of the protected area is expected to help to offset deforestation in Bolivia’s Gran Chaco region.

    The Ñembi Guasu Area of Conservation and Ecological Importance is the second-largest protected area in the Gran Chaco.   The jaguar, puma, the southern night monkey, the southern tamandua live here.



    The area is one of the few places in Bolivia where long-term plans can be made for jaguars and other large animals there.

    The territory is home to more than 100 species of mammals, 300 species of birds, and at least 80 species of reptiles and amphibians.   The area is described as “a large area where animals can hide”.

    Some threats put the territory at risk – the extraction of oil is one.  The Bolivian government approved an order that allows the extraction of oil in natural areas.  Land invasions are another problem. 

    The forest is virgin forest – with lots of wildlife – and it needs protecting