Actions for Animals

 
 
 
Wildlife and our last remaining wild places are being destroyed because of human action or inaction and because of our own short –term greed.

Peter Fearnhead, CEO, African Parks Network, South Africa

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Category: Wildlife Habitat: Forests

  1. Act for wildlife in Cambodia with FFI's urgent appeal in the Cardamom Mountains

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    I’ve had an email from Fauna and Flora International (FFI) about an impending crisis that is about to get catastrophically worse.

    The beautiful Cardamom Mountains in Cambodia are being covered in snares. 

    FFI say that the snares are shredding through clouded leopards, ripping elephant trunks in half and snapping the limbs of their calves.  Pangolins, sun bears, moon bears and indeed any mammal than a mouse are being badly impacted, as any animal larger than a mouse can be trapped in these cruel snares.

    To make matters worse, FFI’s project funding in the area has fallen through.  FFI patrol teams are still able to operate in some areas and maintain an effective resistance.  A very generous donor has enabled them to remove countless snares – and so save many, many animals.  FFI had hoped to extend the areas that they were covering.


    Unfortunately, the donor is unable to continue their support – and FFI must fill a £92,345 hole. 

    If FFI cannot fund the project, the warden leaders won’t be able to pay their patrol teams’ wages – and any who have the means won’t be able to have equipment and the backing to mount and maintain an effective resistance. 

    Funds will be spent on boots, machetes, camping gear, hammocks, rucksacks and everything wardens need to wear as they go out on one patrol after another.   The wardens need GPS kits, patrol mapping – and they need to be paid. 

    FFI say time is short. 

    What’s so important about the Cardamom Mountains?  Well, they have dense rainforest, mangroves and wetlands – and they have more than 60 globally threatened animal species and 17 globally threatened trees.  The Cardamom Mountains matter.  These include:

    • Asian elephants
    • Sun bears
    • The clouded leopard,
    • Dholes, a type of wild dog
    • The Sunda pangolin

    This elephant has been injured by a snare - the boot is protecting his leg
    Young elephant wears a protective boot
    to help recovery, after being caught in a snare.
    Credit: Charnwood Photo

    These snares are CRUEL – as the metal clasp tightens, causing the animal terrible pain.  The more they struggle, the tighter the snare gets, cutting more and more deeply into flesh and bone.  It is a terribly cruel and painful way to die.   

    At the same time, the animals have lost their habitat, because of illegal logging, land encroachment and unsustainable agricultural ways of doing things.  Over 10% of the forest has gone in 15 years  So the animals find themselves in smaller spaces, into what is known as a “wall of death”, because it is easy for them to get trapped by a snare.

    Enter the wardens. They are from the local communities and they cover over 100km every month, spotting and removing snares, watching for any signs of illegal poaching or logging, and undertaking biomonitoring and data-gathering activities.   These activities are important because they give a better understanding of the wildlife in the area, and enable the right decisions to be made about how to help them.

    The clouded leopard is well adapted to prowling through the forest

    The clouded leopard is well adapted to prowling through the forest
    Credit:  Bill – Adobe Stock

    Wardens also help by supplying the human-wildlife conflict teams with flashlights and noise-makers.  These can help deter elephants from the boundaries of farms and villages, so preventing damage to crops and property. These things make a huge impact – there have been no retaliation elephant killings since the wardens started such work.

    The warden team is essential to protect the animals of the Cardamom Mountains. 

    Please help today by making a donation.

     

  2. The Green Match Fund 2021 is from 22nd to 29 April 2022 - don't miss it! One donation, double the impact!

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    The Big Give's Green Match Fund 2022 takes place from 22nd to 29th April 2022.

    Whilst match funds last, donations you make to the incredible environmental charities who are taking part will be doubled! 

    “One donation, twice the impact!”

    Don't miss this opportunity to let your £5 donation become £10 without any extra effort from you! 

    Use the Filter facility to find Animal and/or Environment/Conservation charities taking part.

    Charities taking part include

    • Virunga Foundation (gorillas)
    • Devon Environment Foundation
    • Beaver Trust
    • RSPB
    • South Downs National Park
    • Scottish Seabird Centre
    • WWT (Curlews)
    • Population Matters
    • Rainforest Concern (leatherback turtles)
    • Bat Conservation Trust
    • Thin Green Line Foundation to protect Sumatran wildlife
    • Sumatran Orangutan Foundation
    • Westcountry Rivers
    • Ghost Fishing
    • Organisation Cetecea
    • Great Bustard Group
    • Chipembele Trust
    • Trees for Life (red squirrels)
    • Rainforest Trust UK (African rainforests)
    • Buglife
    • A number of Wildlife Trusts
    • Whitley Fund for Nature
    • ZSL - Year of the Tiger
    • David Shepherd Wildlife Foundation
    • Heribean Whale and Dolphin Trust
    • Global Canopy
    • Earthwatch
    • Surfers against Sewage
    • UK Antarctic Heritage Trust
    • International Tree Foundation 
    • Bumblebee Conservation Trust
    • Rewilding Britain
    • Action for Conservation
    • Lewa Wildlife Conservancy
    • John Muir Trust
    • Cool Earth Action
    • Bees for Development Trust
    • Blue Marine Foundation
    • Trees for Cities
    • Butterfly Conservation
    • Cheetah Conservation Fund  UK
    • Orangutan Foundation
    • Environment Justice Foundation
    • Salmon and Trout Conservation UK
    • Hammersmith Community Gardens Association (beekeeping)

    and there are many more!  The match is available whilst funds last so don't delay,  leap to find out more and/or donate now - please spread the word! 

     

  3. World Okapi Day 2021

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    The okapi live in the dense jungle of the Democratic Republic of Congo.  

    The opaki is under threat

    Although it is a respected cultural symbol of the DRC (have had protect status since 1933), the opaki is threatened by human activities: slash-and-burn agriculture, illegal gold mining, logging, encroachment from human settlement and bush-meat poaching.

    Enter the Opaki Conservation Project

    Enter the Opaki Conservation Project which works to protect the natural habitat of the opaki and indigenous Mbuti pygmies who lives in the Opaki Wildlife Reserve.  It also looks to promote the species around the world.

    The reserve itself is a designated World Heritage Site.  It sits within the Ituri Forest, and it encompasses 13,700 square kilometres. As well as the opaki, it is home to animals such as forest elephants, chimpanzees, 13 species of primates, leopards, bongo antelopes and a huge variety of birds and insects. 

    World Opaki Day’s aims

    World Opaki Day on 18 October 2021 celebrates the opaki – it raises awareness of it as many people have never heard of an opaki.   You can find out more about the opaki here. 

    And crucially, the opaki acts as a flagship species to protect the forest ecosystem where it resides.   

    There are activities around the villages in the reserve and they are combined to educate local communities and protect the opaki.



    Things we can do on World Okapi Day:

    1.  Follow the day on social media: #OkapiConservation and #WorldOkapiDay and #WOD2021 and tell people about okapis.  The Okapi Conservation Project also has a social media kit 

    2.   Recycle your own mobile phone.  Did you know that a cell/mobile phones have coltan?  It’s a mineral mined in the DRC forests, so if you recycle your phone it means less mining in the forest.

    3.   Put okapi photos on social media, using the hashtags hashtags #OkapiConservation and #WorldOkapiDay

    4.  You could also donate to the Okapi Conservation Project – all proceeds go to help protect okapi and its habitat. 

    $15 Supports 1 ranger per day to protect okapi and their habitat. 

    $50 Provides a month of medical care for a ranger and his family.

    £125 Provides one sewing machine for an OCP sponsored women’s group.

    $250 Buys a camera trap to capture photos of okapi in the forest

    5.  Watch okapi videos!   

    6.  Become an Opaki Guardian!  Give a recurring gift and help the project to help prevent habitat loss and preserve the forest, or remove poachers from the forest or support the agro-forestry project. 

    Visit the Okapi Conservation Project



     

  4. Help the Rainforest Trust save a vital 110 acres of Colombian tropical forest

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    The  is working hard to buy 110 acres of Colombian tropical forest.  

    The Rainforest Trust is on the verge of purchasing and protecting 110 vital acres of Colombian tropical forest.  

    The tropical forests are endangered themselves as farms expand and other developments take place.  They are the only place on the planet where you'll find cotton-top tamarins - whose numbers have gone down 80% in just 20 years.

     

    Help the Rainforest Trust save 110 vital acres of tropical rainforest in Colombia

    Help the Rainforest Trust save 110 vital acres of tropical rainforest in Colombia
    Please donate here

     

    As well as cotton-top tamarins, the area is also home to spider and howler monkeys, a critically endangered turtle species and scarlet macaws.  

    Local organisation Fundación Proyecto Tití is working hard to protect the whole area.

    They have blocked the creation of a clear-cutting cattle ranch.

    Now they are working with the Rainforest Trust to secure more land.  The land is critical becuase it will give the animals safe passage - a corridor - between protected areas.  It will give the animals the vital space they need to recover and survive. 

    We can all help the Rainforest Trust achieve this goal.  

    Find out more from the Rainforest Trust and donate here.

    You can donate to this project through SumofUs who partner the Rainforest Trust

  5. The Green Match Fund 2021 is from 22nd to 29 April 2021 - don't miss it! One donation, double the impact!

    Posted on

     

    The Big Give's Green Match Fund 2021 takes place from 22nd to 29th April 2021.

    Whilst match funds last, donations you make to the incredible environmental charities who are taking part will be doubled! 

    “One donation, twice the impact!”



    Don't miss this opportunity to let your £5 donation become £10 without any extra effort from you! 

    Charities taking part include

    • RSPB
    • Blue Marine Foundation
    • Friends of the Earth
    • Highlands and Islands Environment Foundation
    • Space for Giants
    • Conservation Collective
    • Virunga Foundation
    • Trees for Life
    • Global Canopy
    • Rainforest Foundation UK
    • Surfers against Sewage
    • Bumblebee Conservation Trust
    • A number of Wildlife Trusts
    • Rewilding Britain
    • Marine Conservation Society
    • World Land Trust
    • Whitley Fund for Nature
    • Tree Sisters
    • David Shepherd Wildlife Foundation
    • Plantlife
    • Trees for Cities
    • Garden Organic
    • John Muir Trust
    • Scottish Seabird Centre
    • Heribean Whale and Dolphin Trust
    • Cheetah Conservation Fund  UK
    • Orangutan Foundation
    • Environment Justice Foundation