Actions for Animals

 
"Never doubt that a small group of thoughtful, committed citizens can change the world;
indeed, it's the only thing that ever has." 
Margaret Mead, American anthropologist, 1901-1978
 

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Category: Protect wildlife: Poaching

  1. Please thank the wildlife rangers here

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    Send a thank you note!

    Do you ever hear about the incredibly brave work wildlife rangers do on the front lines to protect the beautiful wildlife we all love to much?

    The job of a wildlife ranger is becoming increasingly dangerous – the African Wildlife Foundation says that they must be prepared to act in a number of roles:

    • A solder
    • A law enforcement officer
    • A community liaison
    • A naturalist
    • A medic

    Even whilst the COVID-19 pandemic has been going on, they have been working to protect the species, landscapes and communities in Africa.

    Please thank the wildlife rangers hereImage copyright African Wildlife Foundation

    They undertake rigorous training and face difficult conditions as they work – and they are vital in investigating wildlife crimes.   Both poachers and the very wildlife rangers are trying to protect can be dangerous and deadly.  

    The hours are long and rangers may not see their families for a long time.  Communications can be very limited which means access to urgent help can be difficult or even impossible to come by.

    So the African Wildlife Foundation is giving us all a wonderful opportunity to thank these rangers – we can send them a note in time for World Ranger Day on 31 July!

    Please take a moment to thank wildlife rangers.  

    Say Thank You here

     

     

     

  2. Protecting marine sanctuaries on the island of Siquijor in the Philippines

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    There are some amazing people doing great things for nature and conservation.  

    On the island of Siquijor in the central Philippines, Women have got together to protect marine sanctuaries from poachers and illegal fishers, even though they only have paddles and kayaks.   They are prepared to risk their lives to protect there are.

    The waters are full of rich coral reefs and fish diversity – but they are being impacted by both illegal fishing which has impacted on the coral reefs and reduced fish diversity and its abundance, and climate change.

    This video tells the story of the women.  One woman has been shot at – but she is determined and her efforts resulted in the arrest of the person shooting at her.

    Watch and be inspired…

    The video was supported with a grant from the Earth Journalism Network.

    Source:  Mongabay.com

     

  3. An appeal from Avaaz: Stop the Poaching Pandemic!

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    While the human race is battling against  the coronavirus with 213 countries affected, wildlife are far from immune from it either.

    Elephants, rhinos, pangolins and gorillas all needed wildlife rangers to protect them.   Wildlife conservation groups are faced with the challenge of continuing to protect wildlife and fight poaching whilst budgets are cut and the income wildlife tourism brings to help is virtually non-existent as there are no tourists.

    Enter Avaaz, a 60 million person global campaign network, with petitions to change the world and appeals to make a difference to those who need it.

    And they have an appeal right now.

    An army of 40,000 rangers once protected elephants, rhinos, pangolins and gorillas – and these are in danger of losing their jobs, leaving wildlife at the mercy of poachers and criminal gangs and syndicates.   

    A team of undercover investigators are working round the clock to rack and prosecute poaching rings in 9 African countries and they are jailing thousands.

    Their funding is on the rocks.  Wildlife need us to give them our support, however much that is.

    This is a chance to help vulnerable wildlife.  We can help lock up more criminals, expose international trafficking networks and accelerate global campaigns to protect nature and save vulnerable species.

    Please donate what you can now.   If we all donated the cost of a coffee, that would make a big difference. 

    Avaaz has funded these defenders before from the group EAGLE.  Recently they infiltrated a big illegal trafficking ring.  They uncovered nearly 2 tons of pangolin scales, exposing the kingpins and crippling an international network of criminals.  Crucially, they ensure those who are jailed don’t bribe their way out.

    Let's stop this Poaching Pandemic

    Let's stop this Poaching Pandemic
    image copyright to Avaaz

    If we all chip in, we could (and I quote from Avaaz):

    • Train and sustain many undercover reporters to crack open some of the world’s most wanted wildlife trafficking networks
    • Scale up the number of anti-poaching investigations in 9 countries
    • Arrest hundreds of wildlife traffickers
    • Expose complicit officials and politicians who enable the trade
    • Push to prosecute corporate and government agents who profit from wildlife trafficking
    • Power hard-hitting Avaaz campaigns to protect the natural world and preserve the delicate web of life

    LET'S STOP THE POACHING PANDEMIC 

     

  4. IFAW's 72 Hour Challenge to help elephants and other wildlife

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    IFAW have launched a 72 Hour Challenge to help stop the slaughter of elephants and protect animals around the world.

    Elephants love sweet, crunchy pumpkins – and if they spot a patch of them, they will eat them.  They may even lead their family to share them 

    Donate here to IFAW's 72 Hour Challenge

     

    Sadly, these pumpkins can be laced with deadly cyanide – and that’s done by poachers.

    Parks are empty of tourists and budgets for patrols have decreased or stopped altogether so elephants are very exposed to poaching threats.

    The lack of tourists, reduced ranger patrols and closed parks have made it very easy for poachers to move in, to kill elephants and sell their ivory tusks.

    IFAW (that’s the International Fund for Animal Welfare) are asking us all to chip in and support their 72 Hour Challenge. They are hoping to raise £20,000 by 23 May.

    Donations could help establish and train rangers across landscapes where IFAW is working:

    • £25 could help train a ranger on how to recognise the signs of poison and poachers
    • £50 could help provide the equipment rangers need – maps, boots, uniforms, meal rations – to protect the animals
    • £100 could help conduct an anti-poaching patrol, clear snare traps and protect the animals.

    Please donate what you can to this urgent Elephant Challenge today.  Please share as well.  If we all donated £3 or £5, that would help a lot.

    Please donate today and support this 72 Hour Challenge

     

  5. Rhinos de-horning operation to save this endangered species

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    On 16 May, the UK’s Daily Telegraph brought news of an amazing secret operation to dehorn hundreds of African rhinos.

    They are all threatened by increased poaching during the pandemic.

    Over the next two weeks, up to 400 black and white rhinos will have their horns removed to protect them from poachers.  About 70 have been dehorned so far 

    The rhinos are dehorned with electric saws.  They are sedated.  The horns grow back in about 3 years.   

    The exact location in Africa is secret at the moment.  There is an enormous risk to the team of vets and rangers and the last thing anyone wants is for poachers to find out their whereabouts, for the safety of all concerned, people and animals.

    The Aspinall Foundation and rescue organisation Rhino 911 are involved.   

    Rhino horn can trade for tens of thousands of pounds a kilo.  It is used in medicine and as a status symbol.

    This really is a last resort;  because tourists have stopped visiting as the coronavirus brought lockdown into being, poachers have stepped up to do more poaching.  

    De-horning is a last resort but the situation is critical for rhinos
    De-horning is a last resort but the situation is critical for rhinos


    Once removed, the horns are photographed and taken by armed guard to a secure vault where they are categorised.

    Never should we look back and say "I should have helpd them when I had the chance." 

    Unknown (from Rhino 911's website)

    Visit Rhino 911’s website here. 

    You can donate to Rhino 911 to help.  Donations help in three ways:

    1. Treating rhinos and transporting them if they  have injuries or need surgery; 
    2. De-horning rhinos, which has been shown to be one of the most effective ways to deter poachers from harming and killing rhinos; 
    3. Rescuing rhinos;  many are treated for injuries and airlifted to one of many rhino orphanages that Rhino 911 works with.  Plus, of course donations are given to the orphanages so that they can buy the special formula milk every growing rhino needs!

    There’s a video you can watch at but carries a warning that some parts of it may be disturbing to some viewers.

    Visit Rhino 911’s facebook page

    Keep safe, everyone involved.

    Images copyright to Rhino 911