Wildlife Conservation News

Wildlife and our last remaining wild places are being destroyed because of human action or inaction and because of our own short –term greed.

Peter Fearnhead, CEO, African Parks Network, South Africa

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Category: Wildlife Corridors

  1. Good news for forests in Belize from the World Land Trust

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    The World Land Trust has great news for forests!

    On 16 January 2020, the Governement of Belize signed the declaration of North-eastern Biological Corridor of Belize.  It covers an area of nearly 70,000 acres and links the northernmost nature reserve in Belize with more central natural habitats.

    It’s really important, because it’s the first step towards achieving a total North-South corridor crossing the whole country as the map shows!

    Jaguars and other wildlife now have room to roam

    ©World Land Trust

    It’s a tremendous example of public-private partnership:  the government of Belize, local NGOs, private landowners and many international donors – including the World Land Trust – have been involved.

    UNITED FOR CONSERVATION,
    WE CAN DO GREAT THINGS TO MAKE A DIFFERENCE FOR THE BETTER

    The corridor connects a system of three protected areas in one system.  Deforestation has caused the loss of over 25,000 acres of forest in tihe last 10 years.

    This will now allow big animals such as jaguar and Baird’s Tapirs enough space to move freely between protected areas and so ensure their long term survival!  It will also help build climate resilience into Belize’s network of protected areas.

    Why was this acquisition necessary?

    In Belize, about 50% of the country is under natural vegetation cover.  About 35% of the country is under some form of protection. 

    So it is still possible to create biological corridors between protected areas.

    It’s vital that these acquisitions take place, and speedily, because agricultural development are increasingly encroaching on forest.

    How did supporters of the World Land Trust
    – people like you & me –
    help in this achievement?

    The World Land Trust mobilised its supporters and inspired new ones to raise funds to support this land acquisition.  It included 2018’s Big Match Fortnight Jungle for Jaguars campaign, and another Buy an Acre opportunity a few months after that.  (The Big Match Fortnight normally comes in October when donations are matched for a specific appeal – it is incredible how much and how speedily this builds up.)

    Donate in memory of someone special
    I donated to this campaign during the Big Match Fortnight (actually in memory of my wonderful Dad as his birthday is in November and I plant a tree or do a buy an acre on his birthday and at Christmas for him, as Dad loved trees). 

    Ask someone to donate as a gift for you
    I asked my husband to also donate as my early Christmas present and it was by far the best present I had.   It really meant something to me.  We had made a difference.

    I cannot tell you the glow and warm feeling I have in my heart when I think of my jaguar roaming the biological corridor.   I call him “my jaguar” – he obviously isn’t, and I’m never going to meet him – but it’s lovely to think that because I donated and my husband has too, we’ve helped him and lots of other animals.

    Please do donate to the World Land Trust if you can, and keep an eye on their website.  I often post news of their new appeals here, so you can watch this space as well.  They are a wonderful charity and it’s good to give a meaningful gift which will last, so if you’re looking for a gift for a wildlife lover, making a donation could be a great way to do something to really make a difference – a win, win, win all round!

    This was the You Tube Video for Jungle for Jaguars – it raised £532,000 in the Big Match Fortnight (normally early October) alone and hit the £600,000 target by Christmas, helping to save 8,154 vital acres.  A further 1,818 acres were saved a few months later.

     
  2. Help create wildlife corridors with the Durrell WIldlife Conservation Trust's Atlantic Rainforest Appeal

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    The lush rainforest runs along the Atlantic coast and inland in southern Brazil.  It is home to many species and plants which are not found anywhere else on earth. 

    The problem for wildlife is....

    Sadly, a mere 12% of this huge landscape now persists in very fragmented pockets.  Towns, pastures and intensive farming have replaced the rainforest.  

    Many species living there are threatened with extinction as they are living in small fragmented areas and so are becoming increasingly isolated.  These include the black lion tamarin, the jaguar, ocelot and puma.

    One way to solve this problem...

    The Durrell Wildlife Conservation Trust has an Atlantic Rainforest appeal which is aiming to create wildlife corridors and so joining fragmented areas of rainforest up.

    From small things do great things grow....
    From small things do great things grow....
    ©Durrell Wildlife Conservation Trust

    Durrell wants to protect this ecosystem by creating wildlife corridors to join up the fragmented bits. They will do this by planting trees to connect the Morro do Diabo State Park to isolated forest fragments to the north, thus reconnecting wildlife.

    In doing this project, Durrell is working with their partners at the Instituto de Pesquisas Ecológicas (IPE).

    You can help restore this rainforest by planning 17,000 trees and in creating sustainable livelihoods for local people and neutralize about 2,500 tonnes of greenhouse gas emissions.

    The trees will be planted in community nurseries, planted by local people – so giving them sustainable livelihoods.  People and wildlife will win through this project.

    Help wildlife such as the black lion tamarin, the jaguar, the puma, and ocelot
    Help wildlife such as the black lion tamarin, the jaguar, the puma, and ocelot
    ©Durrell Wildlife Conservation Trust

    Durrell say that:

    • £25 will help the local community plant five trees and nurture them for 5 years
    • £500 will run a community nursery for a week
    • £15,000 will pay for a forest and community officer to oversee the pojrect for a year
    • £85,000 will rebuild 1,000 metres of wildlife corridor connection forest fragments.

    Every £ counts!  

    Join in the appeal to create wildlife corridors to help wildlife thriveJoin in the appeal to create wildlife corridors to help wildlife thrive
    ©Durrell Wildlife Conservation Trust

    Donate here

     

  3. China building ecological wildlife corridors for pandas

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    Looking through the info I have on Good Being Done, I was delighted to see that forestry authorities in Shaanxi Province have launched an ecological corridor programme.

    The province is situated in the north west of China, and the idea behind the programme is to connect habitats of giant pandas which have become fragmented.   This means that the pandas will be able to move between the habitats.

    By way of bridge construction and road culvert clearance, six such corridors will be built by 2027 in the Qinling mountains areas.  The pandas will then be able to move around more easily.

    That’s not all – bamboo trees will be planted along the corridors, and vegetation will be restored.  This means that the pandas will have more to eat.

    The thing is that this defragmentation of panda habitat was all down to human activities again.   Human doings such as road traffic and hydropower station construction caused it. And that meant the pandas couldn’t connect and breed – they find breeding hard enough as it is – so it didn’t help the panda population.

    Nationwide research showed that there were about 345 wild pandas living in the Qinling areas, so may there be many more in the future!

    Source:  

    http://www.xinhuanet.com



    Life of Rare Pandas
    by National Geographic And Wildlife Animal Documentary

     

  4. Bangalow Koalas creating koala wildlife corridor

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    Planting trees with Bangalow Koalas and IFAW

    The IFAW (that’s the International Fund for Animal Welfare) have planted 1,500 koala trees on Irish comedian Jimeion’s property.

    A number of private land owners in the Northern Rivers region of New South Wales, Australia, have taken action to keep the local koalas safe.  They are allowing parts of their properties to be re-planted with eucalyptus trees.  This means the koalas can have a safe haven and pass through the landscape.

    The idea came from Bangalow Koalas who want to restore a koala wildlife corridor from Byron Bay to Repentance Creek.  A neighbour of Jimeion kindly let everyone use his paddock so that they could get to the steep land behind Jimeion’s property.

    Over 120 people came to help, all wanting to help plant koala trees and secure the species’ future.   Amongst them were old and young volunteers – plus tourists from the UK and Germany.  Imagine going home after your holiday and telling people you were part of a volunteer group which planted trees to help secure koalas’ future!

    The land had been prepared already and the holes pre-dug.  Saplings had been provided – and all the volunteers planted 1,500 trees IN ONE HOUR!  They trees were the koalas’ favourite local food trees such as red gum, swamp mahogany, tallow wood and the important medicinal melaleuca that koalas eat from instinct when they don’t feel well.

    The trees grow quickly in the climate and in a few years they will be home for koalas, birds and native wildlife.  And Jimeoin hopes that by planting trees on his land, the koalas will stay.  

    The key message IFAW want us to take from this is that yes, there are messages of loss and possible extinction of koalas.  They are certainly in trouble.  But there is hope – and crucially THERE IS A SOLUTION.

    Bangalow Koalas and IFAW are helping to create a wildlife corridor for me ©Bangalow Koalas

    IFAW and Bangalow Koalas hope to plant 25,000 trees by the end of the year. 

    It’s a fantastic thing to do and I hope they make it.  A big thank you to both IFAW and Bangalow Koalas, and also to volunteers and – of course – to the land owners who are willing to help the koalas in this way 

    Visit IFAW here

    Visit Bangalow Koalas here – check out their gallery, whatever you do.  It has some beautiful photos and videos of the Bangalow Koalas!  You can become a member or donate through their website to help. 

    Here’s a video of another project Bungalow Koalas worked on with the Northern Rivers Community Foundation.  They started a wildlife corridor in Binna Burra in the Northern Riveres of NSW to help conserve the local koalas. 

  5. Help snow leopards by protecting their habitat

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    High in the Himalayas, one of the world’s most beautiful big cats – the snow leopard - roams the lonely mountain slopes

    There are only about 4,000 snow leopards left in the wild.   And now their habitat is threatened with new roads, dams and mining projects disrupting habitats and leaving them with no-where to go.   One of the snow leopards’ last refuges could have a highway built straight through the middle of it.

    But there’s a cunning plan.

    Two Avaazers are working with the local community and the Rainforest Trust to buy up and protect snow leopard habitats.   And if they can raise enough money, they’ll create a vast, permanent snow leopard conservation corridor which blocks the road completely.

    Save snow leopard paradise

    Snow leopards, red pandas, pangolins, wild yaks, the Himalayan Black Bear, clouded leopards, and hundreds of species of butterflies all need us to dig in and lend a paw to make this purchase happen and keep it safe from road construction and mining.

    They need our help 

    We need to buy this precious corner of the world and protect it for snow leopards and all the other wildlife who live there.  The money must be raised within a few weeks – the more of us who chip in the better – and then we can create this snow leopard sanctuary together.

    Chip in now to protect this precious corner of the world, and to help preserve the planet's most threatened biodiversity hotspots -- before we lose them forever:  

    In the last few years, Avaaz has bought a rainforest in Indonesia for orangutans, its funded a Maasai-led wildlife corridor in the Seregeti, and protected a vital piece of the Galapagos.  Now it’s time to fight for the snow leopards. 

    Donate here