Wildlife Conservation News

 
Wildlife and our last remaining wild places are being destroyed because of human action or inaction and because of our own short –term greed.

Peter Fearnhead, CEO, African Parks Network, South Africa


 

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Category: Creation of Conservation Areas

  1. Basking Sharks in Scotland need your support

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    Basking sharks love Scotland (and who can blame them – it’s stunning).  

    They head to the rich waters off the west coast every summer and they take a long journey to take there, coming from as far away as the Canary Islands.

    There’s an opportunity to really make a difference to basking sharks.

    The Scottish Government has launched a consultation on Marine Protected Areas – including one specifically for Basking Sharks.



    They are now considered vulnerable.  Although they have been a protected species I Scotland since 1998, they face threats in Scottish seas from fishing gear, boat traffic and micro-plastics.

    Back in the 19th and 20th centuries, 100,000 basking sharks were hunted in the North Atlantic……   so there aren’t as many of them left as there used to be.

    The proposed Sea of the Hebrides Marine Protected Area will give extra protections to basking sharks and other species such as minke whales. 

    Currently, it is proposed that 4 new Marine Protected Areas (MPAs) be added to Scotland’s exiting MPA areas.   These areas will protect important habitats and large mobile species such as Risso dolphins, Minke Whales and Basking Sharks.

    Find out more and give your support here.


  2. Huge new conservation area in Bolivia’s Gran Chaco

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    There’s a new protected area in Bolivia! It spans over 12,000 square kilometres – that’s 4,650 square miles.  And it includes well-conserved forests – it’s home to 300 species of birds and 100 species of jaguars, pumas and night monkeys.  It’s home too to the Ayoreo indigenous community which is voluntarily isolated.

     “Ñembi Guasu” means “the great hideout” or “the great refuge.”  The creation of the protected area is expected to help to offset deforestation in Bolivia’s Gran Chaco region.

    The Ñembi Guasu Area of Conservation and Ecological Importance is the second-largest protected area in the Gran Chaco.   The jaguar, puma, the southern night monkey, the southern tamandua live here.



    The area is one of the few places in Bolivia where long-term plans can be made for jaguars and other large animals there.

    The territory is home to more than 100 species of mammals, 300 species of birds, and at least 80 species of reptiles and amphibians.   The area is described as “a large area where animals can hide”.

    Some threats put the territory at risk – the extraction of oil is one.  The Bolivian government approved an order that allows the extraction of oil in natural areas.  Land invasions are another problem. 

    The forest is virgin forest – with lots of wildlife – and it needs protecting